Category Archives: Sumatra-Tiger

Sumatran tigers are nearly extinct!

Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) is one of five subspisies tiger (Panthera tigris) in the world that still survive. Including the endangered Sumatran tigers which are also the only sub-species of tigers that still belongs to Indonesia after the two brothers, Bali tiger (Panthera tigris balica) and Java Tiger (Panthera tigris sondaica) declared extinct.

These animals can only be found on the island of Sumatra, Indonesia. Population of them that are living in the wild is estimated to 400-500. Sumatran tigers more rare and are categorized as endangered species. There are at least 250 Sumatran tigers that kept in zoos worldwide.

The impact of destruction of forests by APP is not only devastating the environment but also threaten the Sumatran tigers balance. Sumatran forest destruction by APP to supply the pulp and paper industries which also used for packaging products of Hasbro, Mattel and Disney. Destruction of natural forests is continuously forcing the tiger of Sumatra and other wildlife which live in the woods increasingly pressured closer to the residential society.

 

Sumatra-Tiger in German Zoo in Augsburg
Photographer : Werner Gut (http://www.wernergut.de/)

 

This rare cat could live anywhere, from lowland forests to mountain forest and lived in many places which not protected. Sumatran tigers are the smallest tiger subspecies, have the darkest color among all the other tiger subspecies, the black pattern of them sized width and tightly.

 

Panthera Tigris Sumatrae , German Zoo in  Frankfurt 
Author : From de.wikipedia, originally uploaded by en: User: Wilfred
Photographer / Source: Petra Karstedt

 

Their small size makes it easier to move through the jungle. There is a membrane in between the fingers that make them able to swim fast. Tigers are known to drive hoofed prey into the water, especially if the prey animal is a slow swimmer. This cat patiently stalking their prey before attacking from behind or the side. They eat anything that can be captured, generally boar and deer, and sometimes poultry, fish, and orangutans. They are also able to swim and climb a tree when hunting prey.

Male Sumatran tiger has the average length of 92 inches from the head to tail with a weight of 300 pounds. Females average 78 inches in length and weighs 200 pounds. Sumatran tiger stripes are thinner than other tiger subspecies. This subspecies also had more beard hair and mane than other subspecies, especially the male tiger.

Sumatran tiger can live up to 10-15 years. females generally start breeding at 3-4 years of age. The gestation period lasts between 95-110 days. Females can give birth to six babies, but normally is 2-3 babies. Their fur change color to dark green when giving birth. The babies will stay with their mother until the age of 18-24 months until they are able to be independent in nature.

Sumatran tiger food depending where they live and how abundant prey. Sumatran tigers are generally solitary except during mating season and will be together with female and their children.

 

 

The main threats for Sumatran tigers are habitat destructions and hunting. Deforestation continues even in the national park that should protect them. Recorded 66 tigers were killed between 1998 and 2000.

In the effort to rescue the Sumatran tiger from extinction,  Taman Safari Indonesia (Indonesian Safari Park) is appointed by the 20 zoos in the world as the Sumatran tigers Breeding Center, “studbook keeper” and sperm storage (Genome Bank Rescue) for Sumatran tigers. An expert from the Conservation Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG), Kathy Traylor-Holzer said that the genetic purity of Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae) are highest in the conservation agencies of Taman Safari Indonesia which is located in West Java.  That statement presented at the “Global Species Management System” (GSMS) for Sumatran tigers, which was held at the Royal Safari Garden Hotel.

Experts from Conservation Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG) said that from more or less 100 zoos in Japan, only four zoos that have Sumatran tigers and the number are only seven left.

While in the European region there are 104 Sumatran tigers, in the North American Region there are 69, Australia 51 and in Indonesia zoos there are 96. According to Kathy Traylor-Holzer, Sumatran tigers at Taman Safari Indonesia has the highest genetic purity which reached 93.3 percent.

 

Sumatran Tiger at Melbourne Zoo
Author : Merbabu
GNU Free Documentation License

 

Outside of Indonesia, she said that the genetic purity to the highest Sumatran tigers held by the North American region that is equal to 89.8 percent, then Europe with 86.9 percent, Australia 86.2 percent and Japan with 77.8 percent. She also said that the genetic purity is necessary to protect the existence of Sumatran tigers at the zoo.

Drs. Manansang Jansen, MSc, President SEAZA (Association of Zoos South-East Asia) also said that genetic purity of the Sumatran tigers that achieved by Taman Safari Indonesia  is possible, because they manage the population of Sumatran tigers strictly.

Taman Safari Indonesia will be pleased to assist purification genetic of Sumatra tigers in zoos around the world, but the tiger which will be sent, must fulfill license that set by the laws of Indonesia. Beside that, the Sumatran tigers that would be sent, have to be from the breeding, not from wildlife.

 

Tiger park safari Indonesia (Taman Safari Indonesia)
Public domain

 

 

 

Sumatra Island, and some location of the Sumatran tigers


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The following text was translated from the Indonesian source: http://www.greenpeace.or.id/, naskah diterbitkan pada 26 Juli, 2011

The Tiger driven out from their home

In early July, a year ago, there was a sad news. Sumatran tiger “The King of the jungle” died in a tragic way. This incident documented by Greenpeace when The Tiger was trying to be saved by a team of Natural Resources Conservation Center (BKSDA) Riau-Sumatra. The tiger died in his own territory, which later the place changed into Acacia plantations, owned by APP, Pulp and paper giant company that continues to destroy Indonesia’s forests.

This sad video showing the price that have to be paid by wildlife for their home that missing.

The Sumatran tiger was found already trapped for 7 days. Forest officials arrived to give him a sedative, tried to save and evacuate him, but the Sumatran tigers could not be saved.

The impact of destruction forests by APP is not only devastated but also threaten climate balance of Sumatran tiger. Destruction forest by APP is to supply the pulp and paper for some industries which also used them for packaging products of Hasbro, Mattel and Disney. Destruction of natural forests is continuously forcing the tiger of Sumatra and other wildlife which live in the woods increasingly pressured closer to the residential society.

Our video evidence is increasingly clear that APP did not care about the environment and even destroyed it, the evidence is also increasingly clear that a variety of “sustainable label” that carried by APP highly should be doubted, the credibility of forest certification organization such as the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) is also questionable. PEFC certify ‘sustainable’ to paper products throughout the world, but by many parties repeatedly criticized for their relationship with APP. Extremely surprising, products that contain natural forest timber, which is taken from the dead tiger habitat can be certified by PEFC.

PT Arara Abadi – tigertrapped
Location of tiger habitat clearing by APP. located within the concession13 km, Sumatra, tiger caught in animal traps. © Melvinas Priananda / Greenpeace

Last month Greenpeace used forensic tests to reveal the manufacture of toys, like Barbie and Transformer produced by Hasbro, Mattel and Disney which use packaging from deforestation in Indonesia. This study also used the guide field investigations, mapping data, which reveal newest evidence of destruction natural forests and peat on the island of Sumatra by APP.

Write and send a letter to Mattel to stop forest destruction in Indonesia!

Give education to the future generations not to destroy the future of Indonesia’s forests.
Greenpeace campaigns for protecting forests in Indonesia. Including habitat of endangered tigers.


We please you to sign a petition by Greenpeace on this page: www.greenpeace.org/canada/tigers/
to support the Indonesian Sumatra-Tigers!